HOW TO SILENCE YOUR INNER CRITIC

WE ALL HAVE AN INNER CRITIC… DOES YOURS HAVE A NAME?

This voice is formed at an early age - you may not even be able to differenciate between your own authentic thoughts and those of your inner critic.

YOUR inner critic voice might shout things at you, “Your boss hates you, you are not producing enough results, you will never be praised for your efforts. You are not good enough”

YOUR inner critic voice might be making noise in your relationships, “He/she doesn't really even like you. It will never last. Don’t be vulnerable. Be mad at them. It’s all their fault”

YOUR inner critic voice might be consistently telling you that you aren't GOOD enough.

So then, how do we silence it? How do we tell ourselves we are "good enough"?


WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW AND DOWNLOAD THIS WORKSHEET TO HELP TO CHANGE YOUR INNER DIALOGUE.

After walking yourself through this exercise you will come out the other side being gentler on yourself and your thoughts.


It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.
The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly.
So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.
— THEODORE ROOSEVELT
KAYLA’S PROCESS   I started with my art journal open with two pages exposed. I was drawn to start with writing some of the words my inner critic was shouting at me during the visualization.  I moved onto using oil pastels to fill my page with colour. My inner critic presented as a tornado shouting and spitting things at me. I let the colours lead me.  I did the same process for my inner champion. I wrote some of the words they were whispering to me. My inner champion presented as a gentle “mother nature” kind of woman. Someone who could calm my storm. Someone who was holding me in times of need - gently bringing be back into the bright side of the day.  This exercise is something you can actually do over and over. Every time I do this exercise something different surfaces and I am left with a new epiphany about my inner dialogue. I often get a little brain-reset on how I can speak kinder to myself and how I can reduce some of the noise happening inside my “storm”.

KAYLA’S PROCESS

I started with my art journal open with two pages exposed. I was drawn to start with writing some of the words my inner critic was shouting at me during the visualization.

I moved onto using oil pastels to fill my page with colour. My inner critic presented as a tornado shouting and spitting things at me. I let the colours lead me.

I did the same process for my inner champion. I wrote some of the words they were whispering to me. My inner champion presented as a gentle “mother nature” kind of woman. Someone who could calm my storm. Someone who was holding me in times of need - gently bringing be back into the bright side of the day.

This exercise is something you can actually do over and over. Every time I do this exercise something different surfaces and I am left with a new epiphany about my inner dialogue. I often get a little brain-reset on how I can speak kinder to myself and how I can reduce some of the noise happening inside my “storm”.


Three ways to silence your inner critic:

  1. "Check-in" with your inner critic every once and a while.
    Reflect on how this inner voice effects your own self-talk, your self worth & your interpersonal communications.

  2. Acknowledge that this inner voice is separate from your real world view.
    This voice and it's phrases are NOT REAL. This dialogue exists solely in your thoughts, and is not a reflection of who you are, how good of a person you are or even what others actually think of you. This voice is something you have internalized based on early life-memories, dialogue & behaviours that you witnessed as a tiny person.

  3. Differentiate from your inner critic.
    Write your self-talk down, in "I" statements.
    "I am a bad mom. I don't have any patience"
    AND THEN FLIP IT
    "I am a good mom. I am patient."
    This will help you change the internal dialogue, and hopefully start to change the thought process and turn negative self-talk into positive self talk.


Remember to share your beautiful creations in the Facebook Group or tag @huszarexpressiveart or #yqrtherapy on Instagram!

 
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In everything I do I am (figuratively) shouting from the roof tops for women to seek out the resources they need (ie. self-help books, finding a therapist, accessing support services, and/or personal coaching). Intrusive negative self-talk is connected to perfectionism, anxiety, and depression.  

This expressive art therapy exercise WILL boost your mood, identify some thought patterns and guide you on how to create change within your own life, but please don’t replace these exercises for therapy, personalized care, or individualized advice.

If you are needing more individualized services or to talk this over with a professional, please connect with me. In my private practice I am passionate about holding space for women who are living with stress, anxiety, overwhelm, and depression. I offer a free 30 minute meet + greet to see if I could be the right support person for you. I offer both in-person and virtual therapy sessions.

I believe you are courageous, and if you are someone who is struggling YOU DO NOT HAVE TO DO IT ALONE (oh, please don’t do it alone)! #endthestigma

Until next time, Kayla Huszar